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Please look below for answers to Frequently Asked Questions.

Symptoms

Cough

What is a cough?

A cough is usually a sign your child's body is trying to rid itself of an irritant, from mucus to a foreign object. However, cough can also occur and persist in the absence of an irritant, typically following a viral infection. 

Cough is also associated with certain infections such as flu, croup and pertussis (whooping cough). 

A cough is one of the most common respiratory complaints for which medical attention is sought.

What causes a cough?

Common causes of cough include:

  • Infection:  colds, flu, or croup. If you think your child may have the flu or croup, please consult a doctor.
  • Acid reflux. Symptoms in children may include coughing, frequent vomiting/spitting up, a bad taste in the mouth and heartburn. See your child’s doctor for treatment.
  • Asthma. Symptoms vary from child to child, and can include a wheezing cough, which may get worse at night, or a cough that appears with increased physical activity or during play. See your doctor if you think your child has asthma symptoms.
  • Allergies/Sinusitis can cause a persistent cough, as well as an itchy throat, runny nose, watery eyes, sore throat or rash. Talk to your child's doctor to find out which allergens cause the problem, and how you can avoid them and treat the allergy.
  • Whooping cough, also called pertussis, is characterized by back-to-back coughs, followed by an inhale that has a "whooping" sound. Other symptoms may include sneezing, runny nose and low fever. Whooping cough is contagious, but it is easy to prevent with a vaccine. It is treated with antibiotics.  If you think your child may have the pertussis, please consult a doctor.
  • Other reasons children cough: A child also may cough out of habit after having been sick with a cough; after inhaling a foreign body like food or a small toy; or after exposure to irritants such as pollution or smoke from cigarettes or a fireplace.
What are the different types of cough?

There are five main types of coughs:

  • Dry cough, also called unproductive cough. It does not produce mucus. It may develop toward the end of a cold or after exposure to an irritant, such as dust or smoke.
  • Chesty cough, also called productive cough. It produces phlegm or mucus.
  • Stress cough, a reflexive spasm of the airways caused when you are under stress. It usually produces no mucus and is not generally caused by an infection.
  • Barking cough, which may be associated with croup or other infections. If your child has  a barking cough, you should contact a doctor.
  • A cough that causes a "whooping" sound after the cough may be indicative of a serious infection and should be evaluated by a doctor.
Is Dr. Cocoa® right for my child’s cough?

Dr. Cocoa products contain cough suppressants to help keep the cough reflex under control.  Use them as directed to help calm your child’s cough – any cough due to minor throat and bronchial irritation that may occur with a cold. Left untreated, prolonged coughing can cause unpleasant side effects, such as chest pain, difficulty sleeping and lightheadedness.   Talk to your doctor if your child’s cough lasts more than seven days.

When should I call the doctor?

Ask a doctor before using Dr. Cocoa products if your child has persistent or chronic cough such as cough that occurs with asthma, or cough that occurs with too much phlegm (mucus).

Stop use and ask a doctor if cough lasts more than seven days, comes back, or occurs with fever, rash or headache that lasts. These could be signs of a serious condition.

Seek emergency care if your child is:

  • Choking
  • Having difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • Coughing up bloody or pink-tinged phlegm

Cold

What is a cold? What causes it?

A cold is a viral infection of the upper respiratory tract. More than 200 different viruses can cause a cold, but the rhinovirus is the most common culprit. Cold symptoms include:

  • Cough
  • Watery nasal mucus
  • Sneezing
  • Fatigue
  • Fever (sometimes)
  • Sore throat
What is the difference between cold and flu?

Because flu symptoms are quite similar to cold symptoms, it's often hard to tell the difference. Here is some information that should help:

  • Colds usually come on slowly. The first sign is often a sore, scratchy throat, followed by sneezing and a runny nose with clear mucus that may thicken and turn gray, yellow or green in the following week or so. Other common symptoms include a cough, a mild headache, watery eyes, mild fatigue and a stuffy nose.
  • By contrast, flu usually comes on quickly and symptoms tend to be severe. Children will feel very weak, tired and achy. They may have a dry cough, a runny nose, chills, a sore throat, swollen glands, a bad headache and eye pain. Their appetite may be poor. In babies and children, the flu can also bring on abdominal pain, diarrhea and vomiting.
  • If children act better (or somewhat better) after their fever comes down, they probably have a cold. If they act ill even when their temperature drops, it's more likely they have the flu.

If you're having trouble identifying your child's illness or are concerned about his symptoms, call your child's doctor.

Cold : When should I call the doctor?

Seek medical attention right away if your child has any of the following signs or symptoms:

  • Fever of 100.4 ° F (38 ° C) in newborns up to 12 weeks
  • Fever that rises repeatedly above 104 ° F (40 ° C) in a child of any age
  • Signs of dehydration, such as urinating less often than usual
  • Not drinking adequate fluids
  • Fever that lasts more than 24 hours in a child younger than 2
  • Fever that lasts more than three days in a child older than 2
  • Vomiting or abdominal pain
  • Unusual sleepiness
  • Severe headache
  • Stiff neck
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Persistent crying
  • Ear pain
  • Persistent cough
How can I help my child with cough/cold feel better?

In addition to relieving your child's symptoms with a cough and cold syrup, you can help by doing the following:

  • Making sure your child gets plenty of rest.
  • Giving your child plenty of liquids.
  • Using a humidifier in your child's bedroom at night. The humid environment will help to keep your child's nose and chest clear, making it easier to breathe.
  • Elevating your child's head during rest, which can help them breathe more comfortably

Product

What is the best product for my child’s symptoms?

Dr. Cocoa Daytime Cough + Cold Relief formula is a dual-symptom cough suppressant and decongestant combination medicine with a real chocolate taste that temporarily relieves cough (due to minor throat and bronchial irritation as may occur with a cold) and nasal congestion (stuffy nose), without inducing drowsiness.   It is approved for use by children ages 4–13, but for children ages 4–5, it is recommended to consult with a pediatrician before use.

Dr. Cocoa Nighttime Cough + Cold Relief formula is a multi-symptom nighttime remedy with a real chocolate taste that combines an antihistamine/cough suppressant and decongestant to temporarily relieve cough (due to minor throat and bronchial irritations as may occur with a cold), sneezing, stuffy nose, runny nose, itchy, watery eyes and itchy nose or throat, in order to help a child rest at night.  It is approved for use by children ages 6–13.

Is Dr. Cocoa effective?

All Dr. Cocoa cough and cold medicine for children are made with trusted, effective ingredients that are recognized by the FDA as effective for use among children when used as directed.

Is Dr. Cocoa safe?

All Dr. Cocoa products are made with trusted, effective ingredients that are recognized by the FDA as safe for use among children when used as directed.   

What is the required dosage?

Dr. Cocoa is labeled for use in children, and the dosage for children is as follows:

 

For Daytime Cough + Cold Relief, the dosage and usage directions are as follows:

Age (year)Dose (mL)
children 12 and 13 years of age20 mL every 4 hours; do not take more than 120 mL in 24 hours
children 6 to under 12 years of age10 mL every 4 hours; do not take more than 60 mL in 24 hours
children 4 to under 6 years of age

Consult your doctor before use

  • 5 mL every 4 hours; do not take more than 30 mL in 24 hours
children under 4 years of agedo not use

Use the double-ended dosing spoon that comes with Dr. Cocoa products, and read the dosing spoon carefully, to help ensure that your child gets the correct dose of medicine.

For Nighttime Cough + Cold Relief, the dosage and usage instructions are as follows:

Age (year)Dose (mL)
children 12 and 13 years of age20 mL every 4 hours; do not take more than 120 mL in 24 hours
children 6 to under 12 years of age10 mL every 4 hours; do not take more than 60 mL in 24 hours
children under 6 years of agedo not use

Use the double-ended dosing spoon that comes with Dr. Cocoa products, and read the dosing spoon carefully, to help ensure that your child gets the correct dose of medicine.

Is Dr. Cocoa Daytime Cough + Cold Relief OK for children ages 4 and 5?

The active ingredients in Dr. Cocoa Daytime Cough + Cold Relief are Dextromethorphan and Phenylephrine, which are authorized by the FDA for use by children ages 4 to 5.   But the makers of Dr. Cocoa advise parents and caregivers of children ages 4 to 5 to consult with their child’s doctor before use.

Do Dr. Cocoa products contain stimulants?

None of the active ingredients in Dr. Cocoa cough and cold medicine for children are classified as stimulants. Dr. Cocoa is made with real cocoa powder, and there are very small amounts of caffeine naturally found in cocoa powder. No additional caffeine is used in the Dr. Cocoa formula. One 5 mL dose of Dr. Cocoa (the dosage for children 4 to under 6 years of age) contains only 1mg of caffeine. For comparison, one glass of chocolate milk contains 8 times more caffeine, one cup of tea contains 20 times more caffeine, one can of cola contains 40 times more caffeine and one chocolate bar contains 45 times more caffeine than a 5 mL dose of Dr. Cocoa.

As with any medication, if after using nervousness or sleeplessness occur, stop use and consult a doctor.

Do Dr. Cocoa products contain any nuts?

Dr. Cocoa products do not contain nuts.

Do Dr. Cocoa products contain lactose?

Dr. Cocoa cough and cold medicine for children products do not contain lactose.

Do Dr. Cocoa products contain dyes?

Dr. Cocoa products do not contain dyes.

Do Dr. Cocoa products contain gluten?

Dr. Cocoa products do not contain gluten.

Do Dr. Cocoa products contain alcohol?

Dr. Cocoa products do not contain alcohol.

Do Dr. Cocoa products contain sugar?

Dr. Cocoa products do not contain sugar.  They are made with 10% real cocoa and formulated with additional non-sugar sweeteners such as sorbitol and maltitol, which are derived from sugar and provide half the calories of sugar. 

How many calories are there per dosing?

9.2 calories for each 5 mL dose

Does Dr. Cocoa contain chocolate?

No. Dr. Cocoa has a real chocolate taste, but it is made with 10% real cocoa, not chocolate. Unlike chocolate, cocoa does not contain butter and therefore has fewer calories and less fat. 

Does Dr. Cocoa contain artificial flavors?

Dr. Cocoa contains no artificial flavors. Dr. Cocoa contains 10% real cocoa.

What should I do if my child takes more than the recommended dose?

You should call 911 and seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Control Help Line at 1-800-222-1222

Is Dr. Cocoa safe for children with diabetes ?

Dr. Cocoa cough and cold medicine for children does not contain sugar, but it does contain sugar alcohols such as maltitol and sorbitol which have fewer calories than regular sugar.   Dr. Cocoa contains 9.2 calories per 5ml dose.  As our labeling directs, you should check with your child's doctor before giving Dr. Cocoa to a child with diabetes.

Product use

Why is the expiration date important?

Medicine is given an expiration date to ensure the quality and effectiveness of the product. It’s not recommended you use medicine beyond its expiration date.

Can I use another measuring device in place of the spoon provided with the Dr. Cocoa products?

You should only use the dosing spoon that comes with your Dr. Cocoa product. This dosing spoon is specific to your product. Other precise measurement dosing devices, such as calibrated dosing cups, can be used, but it is not recommended.

Storage

How can I keep Dr. Cocoa out of reach of children?

All Dr. Cocoa products contain child-resistant packaging. However, it is important to keep all medications out of sight and reach of children at all times. Here are a few tips that can help:

  • Store medicine in a place your children can’t reach. Because some children can climb (using the toilet or countertops), locked cabinets are the safest place to keep your medicines.
  • Put medicines away every time. Never leave them out on a kitchen counter or at a sick child’s bedside, even if you know you will need to give your child medicine again in a few hours.
  • Get rid of your old medicine in a way that your child cannot reach it.
  • Teach your children that Dr. Cocoa is medicine – not candy.
What is the recommended temperature for storing Dr. Cocoa?

It is not advisable to use products stored outside of the recommended storage temperatures (68-77 F) since pharmaceutical products have a specific storage temperature range. The temperature should be maintained to ensure the product’s ability to produce beneficial effects.

Other

What should I do if I have more questions about Dr. Cocoa?

Call our Consumer Support Center at 1-855-848-3284 toll free, between 8 am and 8 pm (Eastern time), Monday through Friday.  

Or go to the “Contact Us” page on this website and send us an email.

How much do Dr. Cocoa products cost?

Retail prices are determined by the individual retailer and not by the makers of Dr. Cocoa. However, you can expect the price of Dr. Cocoa cough and cold medicine for children to be comparable to that of other leading pediatric cough and cold products at most retail stores. 

What should I know about teen medicine abuse?

infirst Healthcare, the owner and distributor of Dr. Cocoa products, supports efforts to prevent medicine abuse by teens. To learn more about teen medicine abuse and how to help prevent it, please go to http://StopMedicineAbuse.org/

Dr. Cocoa FAQ